The assessment of impacts of possible climate changes on the results of the IIASA RAINS sulfur deposition model in Europe

Pitovranov SE (1988). The assessment of impacts of possible climate changes on the results of the IIASA RAINS sulfur deposition model in Europe. Water, Air, & Soil Pollution 40 (1-2): 95-119. DOI:10.1007/BF00279459.

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Abstract

An analysis is made of the relationship between patterns in atmospheric circulation in Europe and the temperature regime of the Northern Hemisphere over the same period. The basis for classifying different types of atmospheric circulation or large-scale weather paterns [commonly known as Grosswettertypes (GWT-s) or Grosswetterlagen (GWL-n)] is the identification of the position of centers of cyclones, ridges and troughs. The linear regression between the frequency distribution of GWL-n and the deviation in the mean annual Northern Hemisphere extratropical temperatures from the 90-yr period (1891 to 1980) were tested. The results show that the null hypothesis, i.e. that there no linear relationship, is rejected at the 95% probability level (assuming a normal distribution) for several GWT-s and GWL-n. Changes in GWT-s and GWT-n frequency distribution associated with global warming could substantially change the long-range transport of pollutant over Europe. For example, the decrease in frequency of zonal circulation regimes and the more frequent meridional and blocked circulations (especially easterly flows) could result in a decrease of the existing net export of S pollutants from western to eastern Europe during the winter months.

Item Type: Article
Research Programs: Environment Program (ENV)
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Romeo Molina
Date Deposited: 19 Apr 2016 06:53
Last Modified: 23 Aug 2016 10:47
URI: http://pure.iiasa.ac.at/12788

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