Seven ways of causing the less developed countries' population problem to disappear—in theory

Keyfitz N (1992). Seven ways of causing the less developed countries' population problem to disappear—in theory. European Journal of Population 8 (2): 149-167. DOI:10.1007/BF01797550.

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Abstract

The ways to minimize the difficulties due to population and its growth to be found in current literature have been grouped under seven heads in a far from exhaustive listing: (1) Apply the perspective of rates rather than absolute numbers. (2) Annul the direct negative effects of population with surprising positive indirect effects. (3) Show that neither land nor physical capital is important for development; only labour and human capital count. (4) Exhibit past record of zero correlation between income increase and population increase. (5) Calculate net externality of population increase, but underestimate the externalities falling on women and especially on later generations. (6) Make models of the economy omitting the environment, i.e. implicitly assume the environment is infinite. (7) When all else fails declare that population growth is not bad in itself, but that all evils are due to bad policies-economic, ecological, or urban. Marx thought population growth damaging only under capitalism; now population growth is said to be made innocuous by capitalism.

Item Type: Article
Research Programs: Water (WAT)
Depositing User: Romeo Molina
Date Deposited: 21 Apr 2016 12:43
Last Modified: 21 Apr 2016 12:43
URI: http://pure.iiasa.ac.at/12864

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