Increasing gap in human height between rich and poor countries associated to their different intakes of N and P

Peñuelas J, Janssens IA, Ciais P, Obersteiner M, Krisztin T, Piao S, & Sardans J (2017). Increasing gap in human height between rich and poor countries associated to their different intakes of N and P. Scientific Reports 7 (1): 1-10. DOI:10.1038/s41598-017-17880-3.

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Project: Effects of phosphorus limitations on Life, Earth system and Society (IMBALANCE-P, FP7 610028)

Abstract

We analyzed mean height of men born in the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s in 80 countries. Both height and the change in height during the last decades were correlated with N and P intake, as well as the N:P intake ratio. Rich countries had higher per capita N and P intake than poor countries (on average 19.5 ± 0.3 versus 9.66 ± 0.18 kg N y-1 and 2.17 ± 0.04 versus 1.35 ± 0.02 kg P y-1), and also larger increases in per capita N intake (12.1 ± 2.0% vs. 7.0 ± 2.1%) and P intake (7.6 ± 1.0% vs 6.01 ± 0.7%), during the period 1961-2009. The increasing gap in height trends between rich and poor countries is associated with an increasing gap in nutrition, so a more varied diet with higher N, P, and N:P intake is a key factor to improve food intake quality in poor countries and thus shorten the gap with rich countries. More N and P are needed with the consequent requirements for a better management of the socioeconomic and environmental associated problems.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: adult,food intake,height,human,male,nutrition
Research Programs: Ecosystems Services and Management (ESM)
Depositing User: Luke Kirwan
Date Deposited: 08 Jan 2018 09:11
Last Modified: 08 Jan 2018 09:11
URI: http://pure.iiasa.ac.at/15024

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