Diversity and complexity of angler behaviour drive socially optimal input and output regulations in a bioeconomic recreational-fisheries model

Johnston FD, Arlinghaus R, & Dieckmann U (2010). Diversity and complexity of angler behaviour drive socially optimal input and output regulations in a bioeconomic recreational-fisheries model. Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences 67 (9): 1507-1531. DOI:10.1139/F10-046.

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Abstract

In many areas of the world, recreational fisheries are not managed sustainably. This might be related to the omission or oversimplification of angler behaviour and angler heterogeneity in fisheries-management models. We present an integrated bioeconomic modelling approach to examine how differing assumptions about angler behaviour, angler preferences, and composition of the angler population altered predictions about optimal recreational-fisheries management, where optimal regulations were determined by maximizing aggregated angler utility. We report four main results derived for a prototypical northern pike (Esox lucius) fishery. First, accounting for dynamic angler behaviour changed predictions about optimal angling regulations. Second, optimal input and output regulations varied substantially among different angler types. Third, the composition of the angler population in terms of angler types was important for determining optimal regulations. Fourth, the welfare measure used to quantify aggregated utility altered the predicted optimal regulations, highlighting the importance of choosing welfare measures that closely reflect management objectives. A further key finding was that socially optimal angling regulations resulted in biological sustainability of the fish population. Managers can use the novel integrated modelling framework introduced here to account, quantitatively and transparently, for the diversity and complexity of angler behaviour when determining regulations that maximize social welfare and ensure biological sustainability.

Item Type: Article
Research Programs: Evolution and Ecology (EEP)
Bibliographic Reference: Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources; 67(9):1507-1531 (September 2010)
Depositing User: IIASA Import
Date Deposited: 15 Jan 2016 08:43
Last Modified: 23 Feb 2017 11:29
URI: http://pure.iiasa.ac.at/9194

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