High velocity seawater air-conditioning with thermal energy storage and its operation with intermittent renewable energies

Hunt J ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1840-7277, Zakeri B ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9647-2878, Nascimento A, Garnier B, Pereira MG, Bellezoni RA, de Assis Brasil Weber N, Schneider PS, et al. (2020). High velocity seawater air-conditioning with thermal energy storage and its operation with intermittent renewable energies. Energy Efficiency DOI:10.1007/s12053-020-09905-0. (In Press)

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Abstract

The rapid increase in cooling demand for air-conditioning worldwide brings the need for more efficient cooling solutions based on renewable energy. Seawater air-conditioning (SWAC) can provide base-load cooling services in coastal areas utilizing deep cold seawater. This technology is suggested for inter-tropical regions where demand for cooling is high throughout the year, and it has been implemented in islands with short distances from the coast and the deep sea. This paper proposes adjustments to the conventional design of SWAC plants to reduce implementation risks and costs. The approach is named high velocity SWAC and consists of increasing the excavation depth of the seawater pump station up to 20 m below the sea level, compared to 2 to 5 m in conventional SWAC projects. This allows a twofold increase in the speed of inlet pipeline seawater and cooling load of the plant. The cooling load can be expanded twofold with only 55% capital cost and 83% project costs, compared with the costs of a new system. In addition, this article shows that high velocity SWAC plants with thermal energy storage will have an important role supporting the dissemination of intermittent renewable sources of energy in regions where SWAC is a viable cooling alternative.

Item Type: Article
Research Programs: Energy (ENE)
Depositing User: Michaela Rossini
Date Deposited: 20 Oct 2020 12:27
Last Modified: 23 Oct 2020 05:00
URI: http://pure.iiasa.ac.at/16791

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