An assessment of the potential of using carbon tax revenue to tackle poverty

Fujimori, S. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7897-1796, Hasegawa, T., & Oshiro, K. (2020). An assessment of the potential of using carbon tax revenue to tackle poverty. Environmental Research Letters 15 (11) e114063. 10.1088/1748-9326/abb55d.

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Abstract

A carbon tax is one of the measures used to reduce GHG emissions, as it provides a strong political instrument for reaching the goal, stated in the Paris Agreement, of limiting the global mean temperature increase to well below 2 °C. While one aspect of a carbon tax is its ability to change income distribution, no quantitative assessment has been made within the context of global poverty. Here, we explore future poverty scenarios and show the extent to which carbon tax revenue, obtained to limit global warming to well below 2 °C, has the potential to help eradicate poverty. In order to better understand the relationship between poverty and climate change mitigation policy, we developed a novel modelling framework that includes a module representing poverty indicators in the conventional integrated assessment model. We found that the poverty gap, which is a measure of the shortfall in income relative to the poverty line, is 84 billion US dollars (USD) and that the carbon tax revenue potential for the above-mentioned 2 °C consistent climate change mitigation would be 1600 billion USD in 2030. Many low-income countries cannot fill the poverty gap using only their own domestic revenue; however, this shortfall could be met by using a portion of the revenue in high-income countries. Our results demonstrate that climate change mitigation can have a great potential in synergy effects for resolving poverty and illustrates the importance of international cooperation.

Item Type: Article
Research Programs: Energy (ENE)
Depositing User: Luke Kirwan
Date Deposited: 04 Dec 2020 07:48
Last Modified: 20 Apr 2021 05:05
URI: http://pure.iiasa.ac.at/16904

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