Capturing CO2 from cement plants: A priority for reducing CO2 emissions in China

Zhou W, Jiang D, Chen D, Griffy-Brown C, Jin Y, & Zhu B (2016). Capturing CO2 from cement plants: A priority for reducing CO2 emissions in China. Energy 106: 464-474. DOI:10.1016/j.energy.2016.03.090.

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Abstract

CCS (carbon capture and storage) plays an indispensable role in the technology roadmap of CO2 emissions control for China as a coal-dependent country. China is the world's largest cement producer, and capturing CO2 from China's cement production should be a critical component of the overall strategy for reducing carbon emissions. In this study, we investigate the roles of the three carbon abatement technologies, i.e., energy efficiency, alternative energy, and CCS, in China's CO2 reduction strategy. We examine the potential contribution of implementing CCS in China's cement production facilities by establishing three emission scenarios, and assess the capture cost of three capture schemes. The results show that CCS could reduce 57% of emissions from this industry by 2030, and the cost of capturing CO2 from cement production is 5–20% lower relative to that of coal-fired power generation depending on the different capture technologies implemented. Here is still an urgent need to accelerate the implementation of an industrial pilot and demonstration in China. To facilitate the practical implementation application process and increase the impetus for investment, related climate regulations and market designs must be completed.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Carbon capture and storage; Cement production; CO2 emissions reduction strategy
Research Programs: Energy (ENE)
Depositing User: Luke Kirwan
Date Deposited: 11 Apr 2016 07:12
Last Modified: 25 Jan 2017 16:05
URI: http://pure.iiasa.ac.at/12548

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