Land and the Food–Fuel Competition: Insights from Modeling (Chapter 29)

Prieler S, Fischer G, & van Velthuizen H (2016). Land and the Food–Fuel Competition: Insights from Modeling (Chapter 29). In: Advances in Bioenergy: The Sustainability Challenge. Eds. Lund, P., Byrne, J.A., Berndes, G. & Vasolos, I., pp. 447-464 Chichester, UK: Wiley. ISBN 978-1-118-95787-5

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Project: Water futures and solutions initiative (WFaS)

Abstract

A shift toward low-carbon economies is inevitable when climate change mitigation is a prime concern. Transport fuels account for about one-fifth of CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion. Until 2035, transport energy demand is projected to increase by 40–50% when current or announced policies are implemented.2 Using non-fossil fuels combined with substantial improvements in fuel use efficiency will be fundamental elements for achieving at the same time ambitious greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reduction targets. Biofuels, alternatives to gasoline and diesel that are derived from biomass, have the potential to substantially reduce GHG emissions of the transport sector.
In addition, biofuels offer improved energy security through diversification of the fuel mix and may foster economic development in rural regions. The transition to a low-carbon economy intensifies the energy–agriculture linkage and adds a new dimension to the agricultural system, heightens resource competition in the food sector, and also provides new opportunities for rural communities.
The recent increases in fossil energy prices, combined with political targets and mandates for biofuels, have turned a growing number of agricultural products as competitive feedstocks into the energy market. In the future, food, feed, and energy feedstock markets are expected to integrate more closely.

Item Type: Book Section
Research Programs: Water (WAT)
Depositing User: Michaela Rossini
Date Deposited: 29 Jun 2016 10:32
Last Modified: 15 Nov 2016 07:55
URI: http://pure.iiasa.ac.at/13329

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