Economics in the Air: An Introduction to Economic Issues of the Atmosphere and Climate

Ausubel JH (1980). Economics in the Air: An Introduction to Economic Issues of the Atmosphere and Climate. IIASA Working Paper. IIASA, Laxenburg, Austria: WP-80-092

[img]
Preview
Text
WP-80-092.pdf

Download (2MB) | Preview

Abstract

Many of the problems societies face today are not limited in accordance with the boundaries of the traditional scientific disciplines. This situation holds especially true for environmental problems. While on the one hand economic activity is the principal cause of environmental problems, economic analysis is increasingly called upon to be an arbiter of problems which have in turn been studied by, for example, atmospheric scientists, ecologists, geographers, and agronomists. Just as economists often have difficulty understanding the results of research in the natural sciences, the framework and possibilities for economic analysis are often poorly understood by natural scientists, engineers, and others when they undertake joint studies of problems which require an integrated multidisciplinary approach. Such mutual lack of comprehension has been evident, for example, in recent efforts toward analysis of the effects of long-term climatic change. This paper is intended as an introductory, but broadly inclusive essay for investigators setting out on the study of various aspects of atmospheric issues for which economic analysis may be relevant.

The research for this paper was undertaken at IIASA as part of the Global Climate Task in the Resources and Environment Area during the summer of 1979 and the early part of 1980.

Item Type: Monograph (IIASA Working Paper)
Research Programs: Resources and Environment Area (REN)
Depositing User: IIASA Import
Date Deposited: 15 Jan 2016 01:48
Last Modified: 26 Jul 2016 23:10
URI: http://pure.iiasa.ac.at/1377

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)
Schlossplatz 1, A-2361 Laxenburg, Austria
Phone: (+43 2236) 807 0 Fax:(+43 2236) 71 313