Material Substitution: Lessons from the Tin-Using Industry

Tilton JE (1983). Material Substitution: Lessons from the Tin-Using Industry. IIASA Research Report (Reprint). IIASA, Laxenburg, Austria: RR-84-009. Reprinted from Material Substitution: Lessons from Tin-Usng Industries, John E. Tilton (ed.), Resources for the Future, Washington, DC, USA, pp. 1-11 [1983]

[img]
Preview
Text
RR-84-09.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (5MB) | Preview

Abstract

The substitution of relatively abundant and cheap raw materials for scarce and expensive resources has since the Industrial Revolution helped the world satisfy its voracious appetite for material inputs and cope with the problem of resource deletion. Despite its importance, however, there is still much we need to learn about the substitution process. To what extent, for example, is substitution intertwined with technological change? How important are material prices in simulating substitution? How quickly can substitution normally take place? How does it affect our ability to forecast mineral consumption; to apply conventional economic principles in analyzing mineral markets; to constrain monopoly or oligopoly power in these markets; to alleviate mineral shortages?

This report is a reprint of the first part of a study undertaken in the hope of providing some insights into such questions. It provides an overview or summary.

Item Type: Monograph (IIASA Research Report (Reprint))
Research Programs: Mineral Trade and Markets (MIN)
Bibliographic Reference: Reprinted from Material Substitution: Lessons from Tin-Usng Industries; John E. Tilton (ed.), Resources for the Future, Washington, DC, USA, pp. 1-11 [1983]
Depositing User: IIASA Import
Date Deposited: 15 Jan 2016 01:52
Last Modified: 19 Jul 2016 07:18
URI: http://pure.iiasa.ac.at/2167

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)
Schlossplatz 1, A-2361 Laxenburg, Austria
Phone: (+43 2236) 807 0 Fax:(+43 2236) 71 313