Committed sea-level rise under the Paris Agreement and the legacy of delayed mitigation action

Mengel M, Nauels A, Rogelj J, & Schleussner CF (2018). Committed sea-level rise under the Paris Agreement and the legacy of delayed mitigation action. Nature Communications 9 (1) DOI:10.1038/s41467-018-02985-8.

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Project: Linking Climate and Development Policies - Leveraging International Networks and Knowledge Sharing (CD-LINKS, H2020 642147), Coordinated Research in Earth Systems and Climate: Experiments, kNowledge, Dissemination and Outreach (CRESCENDO, H2020 641816),

Abstract

Sea-level rise is a major consequence of climate change that will continue long after emissions of greenhouse gases have stopped. The 2015 Paris Agreement aims at reducing climate-related risks by reducing greenhouse gas emissions to net zero and limiting global-mean temperature increase. Here we quantify the effect of these constraints on global sea-level rise until 2300, including Antarctic ice-sheet instabilities. We estimate median sea-level rise between 0.7 and 1.2 m, if net-zero greenhouse gas emissions are sustained until 2300, varying with the pathway of emissions during this century. Temperature stabilization below 2 °C is insufficient to hold median sea-level rise until 2300 below 1.5 m. We find that each 5-year delay in near-term peaking of CO2 emissions increases median year 2300 sea-level rise estimates by ca. 0.2 m, and extreme sea-level rise estimates at the 95th percentile by up to 1 m. Our results underline the importance of near-term mitigation action for limiting long-term sea-level rise risks.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Climate-change impacts, Cryospheric science, Projection and prediction
Research Programs: Energy (ENE)
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Michaela Rossini
Date Deposited: 21 Feb 2018 17:34
Last Modified: 27 Nov 2018 15:31
URI: http://pure.iiasa.ac.at/15134

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