Societal Drivers of Food and Water Systems 1: The Approach by Way of Material Flows, Household Consumption Styles, and Contending Schools of Engineering Thought

Thompson M, Beck MB, & Gyawali D (2018). Societal Drivers of Food and Water Systems 1: The Approach by Way of Material Flows, Household Consumption Styles, and Contending Schools of Engineering Thought. In: The Oxford Handbook of Food, Water and Society. Eds. Allan, T., Bromwich, B., Colman, A. & Keulertz, M., Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0-19-066979-9 DOI:10.1093/oxfordhb/9780190669799.013.48.

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Abstract

Food chains interact with the vast, complex, and tangled webs of material flows —nitrogen, phosphorus, carbon, water,
energy—circling the globe. Cities and households are where those material flows interact with the greatest intensity. At every point within these webs and chains, technologies enable them to function: from bullock-drawn ploughs, to
mobile phones, to container ships, to wastewater treatment plants. Drawing on the theory of plural rationality, we show
how the production and consumption of food and water in households and societies can be understood as occurring
according to four institutionally induced styles: four basic ways of understanding the world and acting within it; four
ways of living with one another and with nature. That there are four is due to the theory of plural rationality at the core of this chapter.

Item Type: Book Section
Uncontrolled Keywords: cultural theory, global material cycles, governance, household consumption patterns, irrigation, plural rationality, urban metabolism
Research Programs: Risk & Resilience (RISK)
Risk, Policy and Vulnerability (RPV)
Depositing User: Michaela Rossini
Date Deposited: 22 Jan 2019 13:58
Last Modified: 22 Jan 2019 13:58
URI: http://pure.iiasa.ac.at/15705

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