Methodological issues in measuring international inequality in technology ownership and infrastructure service use

Zimm C ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5603-1015 (2019). Methodological issues in measuring international inequality in technology ownership and infrastructure service use. Development Studies Research 6 (1): 92-105. DOI:10.1080/21665095.2019.1605533.

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Project: TWI2050

Abstract

Access to technologies, infrastructures and their related services are essential for raising global living standards and human well-being. Several of the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) deal with providing access to technologies and service infrastructures to the share of global population so far excluded. At the same time, the SDGs, foremost SDG 10 on reducing inequalities within and among countries, promote a more equitable world, both in terms of inter- as well as intra-national equality. To support monitoring progress towards the SDGs, this paper aims to (1) improve measures of international inequality in terms of basic technologies and infrastructure services associated with the SDGs by explicitly taking into account non-access; and (2) to estimate the international inequality of selected SDG technologies and infrastructure services. It does so by advancing, testing, and applying improved measures of international inequality. The paper shows the discrepancies between accounting and not accounting for non-access from an inequality perspective for international inequality for selected technologies (e.g. mobile phones) and infrastructure services (e.g. electricity). By accounting for non-access on the national level, international inequality estimates are improved. Accounting for non-access leads to changes in country rankings, which the development community uses to measure progress in human development.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Gini coefficient, Lorenz curve, inequality, technology access, SDGs
Research Programs: Transitions to New Technologies (TNT)
Depositing User: Luke Kirwan
Date Deposited: 02 May 2019 13:26
Last Modified: 02 May 2019 13:26
URI: http://pure.iiasa.ac.at/15890

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