Environmental co-benefits and adverse side-effects of alternative power sector decarbonization strategies

Luderer G, Pehl M, Arvesen A, Gibon T, Bodirsky BL, de Boer HS, Fricko O ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6835-9883, Hejazi M, et al. (2019). Environmental co-benefits and adverse side-effects of alternative power sector decarbonization strategies. Nature Communications 10 (1) DOI:10.1038/s41467-019-13067-8.

[img]
Preview
Text
s41467-019-13067-8.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (1MB) | Preview
Project: Advanced Model Development and Validation for Improved Analysis of Costs and Impacts of Mitigation Policies (ADVANCE, FP7 308329), Innovation pathways, strategies and policies for the Low-Carbon Transition in Europe (INNOPATHS, H2020 730403), Standard Interface for Robotic Manipulation of Payloads in Future Space Missions (REINVENT, H2020730035)

Abstract

A rapid and deep decarbonization of power supply worldwide is required to limit global warming to well below 2 °C. Beyond greenhouse gas emissions, the power sector is also responsible for numerous other environmental impacts. Here we combine scenarios from integrated assessment models with a forward-looking life-cycle assessment to explore how alternative technology choices in power sector decarbonization pathways compare in terms of non-climate environmental impacts at the system level. While all decarbonization pathways yield major environmental co-benefits, we find that the scale of co-benefits as well as profiles of adverse side-effects depend strongly on technology choice. Mitigation scenarios focusing on wind and solar power are more effective in reducing human health impacts compared to those with low renewable energy, while inducing a more pronounced shift away from fossil and toward mineral resource depletion. Conversely, non-climate ecosystem damages are highly uncertain but tend to increase, chiefly due to land requirements for bioenergy.

Item Type: Article
Research Programs: Energy (ENE)
Depositing User: Luke Kirwan
Date Deposited: 21 Nov 2019 12:28
Last Modified: 21 Nov 2019 12:28
URI: http://pure.iiasa.ac.at/16180

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)
Schlossplatz 1, A-2361 Laxenburg, Austria
Phone: (+43 2236) 807 0 Fax:(+43 2236) 71 313