Taking stock of national climate policies to evaluate implementation of the Paris Agreement

Roelfsema M, van Soest HL, Hamsen M, den Elzen M, Höhne N, Iacubuta G, Krey V ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0307-3515, Kriegler E, et al. (2020). Taking stock of national climate policies to evaluate implementation of the Paris Agreement. Nature Communications 11: e2096. DOI:10.1038/s41467-020-15414-6.

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Project: Linking Climate and Development Policies - Leveraging International Networks and Knowledge Sharing (CD-LINKS, H2020 642147), Exploring National and Global Actions to reduce Greenhouse gas Emissions (ENGAGE, H2020 821471), Climate Policy Assessment and Mitigation Modeling to Integrate National and Global Transition Pathways (COMMIT, EuropeAid 21020701)

Abstract

Many countries have implemented national climate policies to accomplish pledged Nationally Determined Contributions and to contribute to the temperature objectives of the Paris Agreement on climate change. In 2023, the global stocktake will assess the combined effort of countries. Here, based on a public policy database and a multi-model scenario analysis, we show that implementation of current policies leaves a median emission gap of 22.4 to 28.2 GtCO2eq by 2030 with the optimal pathways to implement the well below 2 °C and 1.5 °C Paris goals. If Nationally Determined Contributions would be fully implemented, this gap would be reduced by a third. Interestingly, the countries evaluated were found to not achieve their pledged contributions with implemented policies (implementation gap), or to have an ambition gap with optimal pathways towards well below 2 °C. This shows that all countries would need to accelerate the implementation of policies for renewable technologies, while efficiency improvements are especially important in emerging countries and fossil-fuel-dependent countries.

Item Type: Article
Research Programs: Energy (ENE)
Ecosystems Services and Management (ESM)
Depositing User: Michaela Rossini
Date Deposited: 29 Apr 2020 10:24
Last Modified: 01 May 2020 13:40
URI: http://pure.iiasa.ac.at/16436

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