Addressing Misconceptions to the Concept of Resilience in Environmental Education

Kharrazi A ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5881-2568, Kudo S, & Allasiw D (2018). Addressing Misconceptions to the Concept of Resilience in Environmental Education. Sustainability 10 (12): p. 4682. DOI:10.3390/su10124682.

[img]
Preview
Text
sustainability-10-04682.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (228kB) | Preview

Abstract

Environmental education is shaped in response to societal and environmental realities and it reflects new interests and demands that enable sustainable transformations. In recent years, the concept of resilience has taken an increasingly significant role among practitioners, researchers, policymakers, and especially within the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Despite its growing importance, the literature surrounding the concept of resilience has struggled to find a consensus on definitions and measurements and therefore may be easily misconceived. In this avenue, a consensus among varying perspectives of resilience may be better achieved by understanding the interaction between students’ prior knowledge (pre-conception) of resilience and the knowledge provided by educators. Based on the case study of five courses that teach the concept of this paper firstly identifies and discusses three common misconceptions among students, focusing on the concept of socio-ecological resilience. These include misconceptions to the value judgment, adaptability, and the costs that are relevant to the concept of resilience. Secondly, this paper discusses educational tools derived from scenario planning and theoretical foundations underlying empirical approaches to the concept of resilience, which may benefit educators in enabling critical thinking to address such common misconceptions. This paper may contribute to ongoing discussions in the environmental education literature, specifically to both pedagogy and curriculum focusing on the concept of resilience.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: environmental education; resilience; misconceptions; scenario planning; systems thinking
Research Programs: Advanced Systems Analysis (ASA)
Depositing User: Luke Kirwan
Date Deposited: 07 Jan 2019 11:01
Last Modified: 07 Jan 2019 11:01
URI: http://pure.iiasa.ac.at/15665

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)
Schlossplatz 1, A-2361 Laxenburg, Austria
Phone: (+43 2236) 807 0 Fax:(+43 2236) 71 313